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by CASEN LLC

Types of Bullying

Verbal bullying is saying or writing mean things.

Verbal bullying includes:

  • Teasing
  • Name-calling
  • Inappropriate sexual comments
  • Taunting
  • Threatening to cause harm

Social bullying, sometimes referred to as relational bullying, involves hurting someone’s reputation or relationships.

Social bullying includes:

  • Leaving someone out on purpose
  • Telling other children not to be friends with someone
  • Spreading rumors about someone
  • Embarrassing someone in public

Physical bullying involves hurting a person’s body or possessions.

Physical bullying includes:

  • Hitting/kicking/pinching
  • Spitting
  • Tripping/pushing
  • Taking or breaking someone’s things
  • Making mean or rude hand gestures

According to stopbullying.gov,

“Cyberbullying is bullying that takes place over digital devices like cell phones, computers, and tablets. Cyberbullying can occur through SMS, Text, and apps, or online in social media, forums, or gaming where people can view, participate in, or share content.”

  • Cyberbullying includes sending, posting, or sharing negative, harmful, false, or mean content about someone else. CASEN teaches students how everything they post on social media creates a digital footprint that cannot be erased. This footprint is visible to college and job recruiters.
  • Some cyberbullying crosses the line into unlawful or criminal behavior. Cyberbullying can harm the online reputations of everyone involved – not just the person being bullied, but those doing the bullying or participating in it. CASEN explains how laws surrounding social media change from state to state. Depending on the state, certain content sent via text can be associated with criminal charges, even if students just forward content that someone sent them.

Resources

There are two sources of federally collected data on youth bullying:

  • The 2017 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey (National Center for Education Statistics and Bureau of Justice) indicates that, nationwide, about 20% of students ages 12-18 experienced bullying.
  • The 2019 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) indicates that, nationwide, 19.5% of students in grades 9–12 report being bullied on school property in the 12 months preceding the survey.

Reference

  • Stopbullying.gov– A federal government website managed by the
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Anti-Bullying